Author Archives: Christie Lane

Meeting Minutes.

Meeting minutes summaries will now be posted weekly, for people that couldn’t show up. We’ve got many weeks that we’ve met, and I’m finally posting the meeting minutes for them. Whew.

First meeting (awhile ago)

The topic was reform vs. revolution. It was discussion-based.

  • We went around in a circle and proposed our personal ideas of what is needed to fix deep systemic problems, whether it was reform or revolution based (not violent revolution!)
  • Proposed that we be more open, more creative with art, coffeehouses, speakouts, etc
  • Emphasized that change of self is very important to whatever movement is going on
  • Vigorous application of your ideal self and your potential everyday is a good idea
  • For true revolution, EVERYONE needs to be supporters
  • Ran into questions of communes working with medicine, supplies, etc (get into that at a later meeting)
  • “Things that work, Survive”.
  • Talked about the name, unschool, being too abrasive to people.
  • Talked about all-one concept: everything is part of the whole
  • Discussed the concept of change: People both need to be educated and also empowered to take action
  • Art as displaying the beauty and the scale of trying to help everything
  • No definitions. No standards.

Second Meeting : Venus project and Zeitgeist movement

  • Where do we go from here? Possibilities of technology
  • Our current state of affairs is mostly unintentional. Noone wanted war, poverty, etc
  • “Spaceship Earth” Concept covered: Earth and all creatures as one, no seperation of nations, people, material, etc
  • The idea of competing ideas, not people.
  • Technology replacing processes that are menial tasks, more autonomous, more freedom
  • Went over social conditioning, false lessons, “Right and Wrong”
  • Reforming our world starts with ourselves
  • Means need to equal the ends
  • Idea of memetics: spreading ideas exponentially
  • Voluntary society

Third Meeting: Social Construction. Heated conversation.

  • 2 groups: Oppressed and Privileged.
  • Privileged group: perpetuated by oppressed, norms, media, power, etc
  • Oppressed group internalized message that they should be “normal”
  • “Duties” and how that buys into the system, filling “roles”
  • Colonization of the mind: Oppressed group is so oppressed they think what they are doing is acceptable and not questionable
  • Advocate model: actively resisting norms and standards
  • Patriarchy: System run by men for men.
  • To be an active resistor, you must learn of your privilege compared to others
  • Did pie charts to see how privileged we were. If it was full, you were the most privileged. Mine was full!
  • To be “privileged” means the ability to ignore oppression or the ability to recognize it and resist
  • If we had a society with no categorization of people, social equity would be reached
  • Recognize the imperfection of language
  • See people for how they choose to be seen

More meeting minutes coming up next week. Cheers.

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Filed under Anarchy, Art, Love, Meeting Minutes

Un-open your coke.

Coca-Cola is everywhere at UNH. I’m fairly certain they fund the sustainability program.. 😦

Why don’t we do something about it? What’s so bad about Coke, you ask?

1) Coke is NOT a local business, obviously. That means the majority of the money spent on coke products DOESN’T go back into the community.

2) Homogenized, “standard” products, as opposed to a unique product offered by a business in the seacoast area

3) Overexploitation and Pollution of Water Sources in India (indiaresource.org), Mexico (ciepac.org), Ghana and elsewhere  (polarisinstitute.org)

4)Aggressive Marketing to Children of Nutritionally Worthless and Damaging Products (commercialexploitation.org and schoolpouringrights.com)

5) “Coca Cola has contracted with or otherwise directed paramilitary security forces that utilize extreme violence and murdered, tortured, unlawfully detained or otherwise silenced trade union leaders”- (Killercoke.org)

Anyways, the answer is pretty simple. I believe we should eliminate vending machines completely, because they waste tons of energy and promote a wasteful lifestyle (eating packaged food shipped from faraway places is NOT green). BUT a step in that direction would be something like…eliminating COKE from UNH! Tons of other colleges have done it, so lets roll!

For more info, check out killercoke.org.

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Filed under Capitalism, Corporate UNH, Environment, Love, National Movement

University PD. Bless their souls!

“The mission of the University of New Hampshire Police Department is to support the University in creating an environment that is conducive to higher education by protecting life and property and assisting members of the University community.”

Pulled this off the UNH Police Department homepage. What a sham.

First off, we have no “good Samaritan policy”. It basically is a policy initiated by some colleges that relieves students of their alcohol offenses if they are calling for medical help from alcohol poisoning.

Students at UNH, however, get in trouble when they call for help.

Also, just last week drug-sniffing dogs raided the minis, looking for pot most likely. How is that protecting students? Sounds to me like a nice way to “show enforcement” to please the officials in New Hampshire..

Also, the fact that police can arrest you for having a few beers in your fridge, even when not drinking them, is atrocious. I’m thinking we need a little leeway here..Am I wrong? Maybe a student movement to reduce the UNH department’s power on campus?

One more thing. The university is considering adding a bunch of cameras around campus. Well, sounds like a safer place after the cameras are installed right? Wrong. Cameras actually aren’t effective deterrents of crime, and even after crimes are committed they arent very useful (Look it up). Then theres the Orwellian-esque surveillance aspect…Who knows how these can be abused by the PD? We’ve seen their work on drug and alcohol charges, who knows- If you “look drunk” on camera it could be proof, right?  Or maybe it will push students into a state of fear, a ominous police-state always watching could certainly do that…

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The structure?

Sorry if I messed with the site- I’ll explain:

I saw whoever modified the site wanted more organization, and I agree. But the way that you did it put specific posts into static pages, which can’t be organized by category or tags, and can’t be archived. Also, the comments on those static pages are much harder to track.

I simply made it easier to categorize and tag things for organization. Now if anyone has something to put on the site, Post it. This way, you can tag and categorize it and it can be archived for later usage when newer posts take its place. The other pages that aren’t under “News/Posts” are static, therefore they are better for reference to specific info that doesnt get updated often.

Once again, sorry, but I feel its a better way to organize, I hope you understand that. Feel free to comment.

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Alternative Medicine/Herbology

Below is a profile I did on Joseph Carringer who works out of Portsmouth. I think it is important for us to remember that medicine can be defined extremely broadly and there are so many different ways one can go about healing themselves and others. Didgeridoo Sound Therapy is one of these options! -L

“Fourteen years ago Joseph Carringer sat straight up in bed in the middle of the night with his eyes wide open. His girlfriend at the time curiously looked up at him from underneath the covers. “I’m going to play the didgeridoo,” said Joseph to no one in particular. He had no idea what he had been dreaming about or what a didgeridoo was; yet something had compelled him to make the statement. The rest is history.
Growing up in a military family, Joseph moved from place to place before spending most of his childhood in Nashua, New Hampshire. In his adult life, he has kept that nomadic pattern and explored much of the eastern side of the United States. His experiences vary from working with hemp textiles in D.C. and in the garment district of New York City, to helping run bars, doing landscaping, and playing music with DJ’s in Jersey City and Portland Maine, to name a few. But nothing could prepare him for the change in direction that would take place after that profound dream and ultimately lead him to a career in Didgeridoo Sound Therapy.
During an outing in Portsmouth about 6 months after his dream, Joseph found himself in Macroscopic, a boutique in the downtown area. There in front of him lay a basket of Didgeridoos and intuitively he picked one up and blew into the hollowed out piece of wood.
“The women who was working looked from around the corner and said, ‘Do you play the Didge?’ and I said, ‘no’ and she looked straight at me and said, ‘yes, you do’.” said Joseph.
The Didgeridoo is an ancient Aboriginal Australian instrument said to be at least 15,000 years old (40K-80K years old). By vibrating the lips, the instrument creates a drone like sound and can be played continuously by a technique called circular breathing. This is done by breathing in the nose at the same time as breathing out the mouth. The technique usually takes people many months of practice but for Joseph it was only a week and a half. At the time he was bar manager of a blues club in Merrimack called Stormy Mondays and one night was pulled up on stage with his Didge to play with the band.
“It was great, I learned to play rhythmically just from hanging with the players,” said Joseph.
When Joseph first started playing it was all about the music, but he soon realized there was an inner peace that the Didgeridoo brought to him.
“I lived near a river, and I would go sit with my dog and meditate, not realizing I was meditating, but just listening to the wind and birds and play and play and play,” said Joseph.
After doing some research Joseph came across an article that a doctor had written about the side effects of someone playing a didgeridoo over someone else. The list seemed endless; relief of muscle spasms, relief of muscle tension, stress reduction, relief of insomnia etc. From there he asked friends, parents, and community members to let him test out his own stress reduction system on them.
“I found out it was helping [them] with muscle tension and stress reduction and I got to thinking, there must be something to this,” said Joseph.
After doing extensive research and speaking with numerous alternative medicine practitioners in the area, Joseph started doing combinational work with traditional Chinese medicine, Shamanism, Acupuncture, Reiki, and Massage Therapy.
Joseph opened DidgeTherapy.com out of Portsmouth in 2004 and learned just how important his work could be for people. This therapy can be broken into three integrative parts which, combined, benefit people in many different ways.
First, “It’s a sound massage,” said Joseph. “That’s the easiest way to explain it to people.”
The vibrations of the Didgeridoo work in a similar way to an ultra sound. The sound waves can go down to zero hertz and “at that low of a frequency range you can snuff out a candle.”  These vibrations warm the muscles from the inside creating relaxation throughout whatever is tender or strained.
Second, is energetically. It’s very similar to Reiki or Chi-gong, but “like a power washer”. Reiki and Chi-gong are similar in practice. Both philosophies involve the transferring of a universal life force or spiritual energy through the master into the person who is receiving the energy, which induces a healing effect. Unlike Reiki, which needs both the master and the receiver to work together to remove energy blockages, the sound waves of the didgeridoo literally forces blockages of energy out of the body.
Joseph integrates the Chakra theory into his therapy. Chakras initially were discovered in several eastern traditions and describe whorls of energy permeating out of the physical body. There are seven major Chakras in the body and each is attached to different organs and emotional states.
The seven different keys a didgeridoo can be played in match up to the energy waves of the seven Chakras. Joseph plays the entire energetic system of a person and tries to align or balance each persons specific Chakras with the different keys. Energetic stagnation and emotional stagnation that resides in the body are typically in specific organs. The Didgeridoo helps remove these stagnations by realigning the Chakras.
“Avedic medicine for 3500 years has known the underlying tones of energetic system line up just like a scale. When you hear something in tune why does it sound in tune? It’s because there is a universal hum,” said Joseph.
The third and final way the Didgeridoo works is meditatively.
“The first two things are really nice but meaningless if a person cannot connect with their own delta brain waves and actually heal themselves,” said Joseph. “[One] needs a mind-body connection”.
He explained that as a culture we are constantly on the go. When we wake up in the morning the first thing we think about is all the things we have to do that day and when were done the first thing we do is turn on the T.V. This constant “plugged” feeling makes our brain constantly run on overtime and does not give our mind or consciousness a time to relax and connect itself with our physical bodies. This makes for a build up of tension, anxiety, and stress, with no time to just release it.
“My job is to teach people that it’s ok to say no to the media, no to feeling like they have to work 24/7, no to going to the mall, and yes to doing something for themselves—that something being nothing,” said Joseph. “When you look at all the wonderful things western advancements have brought to people, the question still arises of what does the average person do for themselves?”
Still through out all his work, Joseph insists he is not a healer.”

Joseph Carringer works out of his home office in Portsmouth and more information on his work can be obtained at DidgeTherapy.com

(CriticalConstant.blogspot.Com)

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THE MAD FARMER LIBERATION FRONT

Love the quick profit, the annual raise,
vacation with pay. Want more
of everything ready-made. Be afraid
to know your neighbors and to die.
And you will have a window in your head.
Not even your future will be a mystery
any more. Your mind will be punched in a card
and shut away in a little drawer.
When they want you to buy something
they will call you. When they want you
to die for profit they will let you know.

So, friends, every day do something
that won’t compute. Love the Lord.
Love the world. Work for nothing.
Take all that you have and be poor.
Love someone who does not deserve it.
Denounce the government and embrace
the flag. Hope to live in that free
republic for which it stands.
Give your approval to all you cannot
understand. Praise ignorance, for what man
has not encountered he has not destroyed.

Ask the questions that have no answers.
Invest in the millenium. Plant sequoias.
Say that your main crop is the forest
that you did not plant,
that you will not live to harvest.
Say that the leaves are harvested
when they have rotted into the mold.
Call that profit. Prophesy such returns.

Put your faith in the two inches of humus
that will build under the trees
every thousand years.
Listen to carrion – put your ear
close, and hear the faint chattering
of the songs that are to come.
Expect the end of the world. Laugh.
Laughter is immeasurable. Be joyful
though you have considered all the facts.
So long as women do not go cheap
for power, please women more than men.
Ask yourself: Will this satisfy
a woman satisfied to bear a child?
Will this disturb the sleep
of a woman near to giving birth?

Go with your love to the fields.
Lie down in the shade. Rest your head
in her lap. Swear allegiance
to what is nighest your thoughts.
As soon as the generals and the politicos
can predict the motions of your mind,
lose it. Leave it as a sign
to mark the false trail, the way
you didn’t go. Be like the fox
who makes more tracks than necessary,
some in the wrong direction.
Practice resurrection.

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Filed under Environment, Love, Related Thoughts, Self

No Masters

If you liked school, you’ll love work. The cruel, absurd abuses of power, the self-satisfied authority that the teachers and principals lorded over you, the intimidation and ridicule of your classmates don’t end at graduation. Those things are all present in the adult world, only more so. If you thought you lacked freedom before, wait until you have to answer to shift leaders, managers, owners, landlords, creditors, tax collectors, city councils, draft boards, law courts, and police. When you get out of school you may escape the jurisdiction of some authorities, but you enter the control of even more domineering ones. Do you enjoy being controlled by others who don’t understand or care about your wants and needs? Do you get anything out of obeying the instructions of employers, the restrictions of landlords, the laws of magistrates, people who have powers over you that you would never have given them willingly? And how is it that they get all this power? The answer is hierarchy. Hierarchy is a value system in which your worth measured by the number of people and things you control, and how well you obey those above you. Weight is exerted downward through the power structure: everyone is forced to accept and conform to this system by everyone else. You’re afraid to disobey those above you because they can bring to bear against you the power of everyone and everything under them. You’re afraid to abdicate your power over those below you because they might end up above you. In our hierarchical system, we’re all so busy trying to protect ourselves from each other that we never have a chance to stop and think if this is really the best way our society could be organized. If we could think about it, we’d probably agree that it isn’t; for we all know happiness comes from control over our own lives, not other people’s lives. And as long as we’re busy competing for control over others, we’re bound to be the victims of control ourselves. Even the ones at the very top of the ladder are controlled by their position: they have to work around the clock to maintain it. One false move, and they could end up at the bottom. It is our hierarchical system that teaches us from childhood to accept the power of any authority figure, regardless of whether it is in our best interest or not. We learn to bow instinctively before anyone who claims to be more important than we are. It is hierarchy that makes homophobia common among poor people in the U.S.A.—they’re desperate to feel more valuable, more significant than somebody. It is hierarchy at work when two hundred hardcore kids go to a rock club (already a mistake, but that’s a subject for another article) to see a band, and for some stupid reason the clubowner won’t let them perform: there are two hundred and six people at the club, two hundred and five of whom want the band to play, but they all accept the decision of the clubowner just because he is older and owns the place (i.e. has more financial clout, and thus more legal clout). It is hierarchical values that are responsible for racism (“white people are better than black people”), classism (“rich people are better than poor people”), sexism (“men are better than women”), and a thousand other prejudices that are deeply ingrained in our society. It is hierarchy that makes rich people look at poor people as if they aren’t even human, and vice versa. It pits employer against employee, manager against worker, teacher against student, making people struggle against each other rather than work together to help each other; separated this way, they can’t benefit from each other’s skills and ideas and abilities, but must live in jealousy and fear of them. It is hierarchy at work when your boss insults you or makes sexual advances at you and you can’t do anything about it, just as it is when police flaunt their power over you. For power does make people cruel and heartless, and submission does make people cowardly and stupid: and most people in a hierarchical system partake in both. Hierarchical values are responsible for our destruction of the natural environment and the exploitation of animals: led by the capitalist West, our species seeks control over anything we can get our claws on, at any cost to ourselves or others. And it is hierarchical values that send us to war, fighting for power over each other, inventing more and more powerful weapons until finally the whole world teeters on the edge of nuclear annihilation. But what can we do about hierarchy? Isn’t that just the way the world works? Or are there other ways that people could interact, other values we could live by?

Hierarchy . . . and Anarchy
Resurrecting anarchism as a personal approach to life.

Stop thinking of anarchism as just another “world order,” just another social system. From where we all stand, in this very dominated, very controlled world, it is impossible to imagine living without any authorities, without laws or governments. No wonder anarchism isn’t usually taken seriously as a large-scale political or social program: no one can imagine what it would really be like, let alone how to achieve it—not even the anarchists themselves.

Instead, think of anarchism as an individual orientation to yourself and others, as a personal approach to life. That isn’t impossible to imagine. Conceived in these terms, what would anarchism be? It would be a decision to think for yourself rather than following blindly. It would be a rejection of hierarchy, a refusal to accept the “god given” authority of any nation, law, or other force as being more significant than your own authority over yourself. It would be an instinctive distrust of those who claim to have some sort of rank or status above the others around them, and an unwillingness to claim such status over others for yourself. Most of all, it would be a refusal to place responsibility for yourself in the hands of others: it would be the demand that each of us be able to choose our own destiny.

According to this definition, there are a great deal more anarchists than it seemed, though most wouldn’t refer to themselves as such. For most people, when they think about it, want to have the right to live their own lives, to think and act as they see fit. Most people trust themselves to figure out what they should do more than they trust any authority to dictate it to them. Almost everyone is frustrated when they find themselves pushing against faceless, impersonal power.

You don’t want to be at the mercy of governments, bureaucracies, police, or other outside forces, do you? Surely you don’t let them dictate your entire life. Don’t you do what you want to, what you believe in, at least whenever you can get away with it? In our everyday lives, we all are anarchists. Whenever we make decisions for ourselves, whenever we take responsibility for our own actions rather than deferring to some higher power, we are putting anarchism into practice. So if we are all anarchists by nature, why do we always end up accepting the domination of others, even creating forces to rule over us? Wouldn’t you rather figure out how to coexist with your fellow human beings by working it out directly between yourselves, rather than depending on some external set of rules? Remember, the system they accept is the one you must live under: if you want your freedom, you can’t afford to not be concerned about whether those around you demand control of their lives or not.

Do we really need masters to command and control us? In the West, for thousands of years, we have been sold centralized state power and hierarchy in general on the premise that we do. We’ve all been taught that without police, we would all kill each other; that without bosses, no work would ever get done; that without governments, civilization itself would fall to pieces. Is all this true? Certainly, it’s true that today little work gets done when the boss isn’t watching, chaos ensues when governments fall, and violence sometimes occurs when the police aren’t around. But are these really indications that there is no other way we could organize society? Isn’t it possible that workers won’t get anything done unless they are under observation because they are used to not doing anything without being prodded—more than that, because they resent being inspected, instructed, condescended to by their managers, and don’t want to do anything for them that they don’t have to? Perhaps if they were working together for a common goal, rather than being paid to take orders, working towards objectives that they have no say in and that don’t interest them much, they would be more proactive. Not to say that everyone is ready or able to do such a thing today; but our laziness is conditioned rather than natural, and in a different environment, we might find that people don’t need bosses to get things done. And as for police being necessary to maintain the peace: we won’t discuss the ways in which the role of “law enforcer” brings out the most brutal aspects of human beings, and how police brutality doesn’t exactly contribute to peace. How about the effects on civilians living in a police-protected state? Once the police are no longer a direct manifestation of the desires of the community they serve (and that happens quickly, whenever a police force is established: they become a force external to the rest of society, an outside authority), they are a force acting coercively on the people of that society. Violence isn’t just limited to physical harm: any relationship that is established by force, such as the one between police and civilians, is a violent relationship. When you are acted upon violently, you learn to act violently back. Isn’t it possible, then, that the implicit threat of police on every street corner—of the near omnipresence of uniformed, impersonal representatives of state power—contributes to tension and violence, rather than dispelling them? If that doesn’t seem likely to you, and you are middle class and/or white, ask a poor black or Hispanic man how the presence of police makes him feel. When the standard forms of human interaction all revolve around hierarchical power, when human intercourse so often comes down to giving and receiving orders (at work, at school, in the family, in legal courts), how can we expect to have no violence in our system? People are used to using force against each other in their daily lives, the force of authoritarian power; of course using physical force cannot be far behind in such a system. Perhaps if we were more used to treating each other as equals, to creating relationships based upon equal concern for each other’s needs, we wouldn’t see so many people resort to physical violence against each other. And what about government control? Without it, would our society fall into pieces, and our lives with it? Certainly, things would be a great deal different without governments than they are now—but is that necessarily a bad thing? Is our modern society really the best of all possible worlds? Is it worth it to grant masters and rulers so much control over our lives, out of fear of trying anything different? Besides, we can’t claim that we need government control to prevent mass bloodshed, because it is governments that have perpetrated the greatest slaughters of all: in wars, in holocausts, in the centrally organized enslaving and obliteration of entire peoples and cultures. And it may be that when governments break down, many people lose their lives in the resulting chaos and infighting. But this fighting is almost always between other power-hungry hierarchical groups, other would-be governors and rulers. If we were to reject hierarchy absolutely, and refuse to serve any force above ourselves, there would no longer be any large scale wars or holocausts. That would be a responsibility each of us would have to take on equally, to collectively refuse to recognize any power as worth serving, to swear allegiance to nothing but ourselves and our fellow human beings. But if we all were to do it, we would never see another world war again.

Of course, even if a world entirely without hierarchy is possible, we should not have any illusions that any of us will live to see it realized. That should not even be our concern: for it is foolish to arrange your life so that it revolves around something that you will never be able to experience. We should, rather, recognize the patterns of submission and domination in our own lives, and, to the best of our ability, break free of them. We should put the anarchist ideal (no masters, no slaves) into effect in our daily lives however we can. Every time one of us remembers not to accept the authority of the powers that be at face value, each time one of us is able to escape the system of domination for a moment (whether it is by getting away with something forbidden by a teacher or boss, relating to a member of a different social stratum as an equal, etc.), that is a victory for the individual and a blow against hierarchy.

Do you still believe that a hierarchy-free society is impossible? There are plenty of examples throughout human history: the bushmen of the Kalahari desert still live together without authorities, never trying to force or command each other to do things, but working together and granting each other freedom and autonomy. Sure, their society is being destroyed by our more warlike one—but that isn’t to say that an egalitarian society could not exist that was extremely hostile to, and well-defended against, the encroachments of external power! William Burroughs writes about an anarchist pirates’ stronghold a hundred years ago that was just that.

If you need an example closer to your daily life, remember the last time you gathered with your friends to relax on a Friday night. Some of you brought food, some of you brought entertainment, some provided other things, but nobody kept track of who owed what to whom. You did things as a group and enjoyed yourselves; things actually got done, but nobody was forced to do anything, and nobody assumed the position of chief. We have these moments of non-capitalist, non-coercive, non-hierarchical interaction in our lives constantly, and these are the times when we most enjoy the company of others, when we get the most out of other people; but somehow it doesn’t occur to us to demand that our society work this way, as well as our friendships and love affairs. Sure, it’s a lofty goal to ask that it does—but let’s dare to reach for high goals, let’s not fucking settle for anything less than the best in our lives! Each of us only gets a few years on this planet to enjoy life; let’s try to work together to do it, rather than fighting amongst each other for miserable prizes like status and power.

“Anarchism” is the revolutionary idea that no one is more qualified than you are to decide what your life will be.

—It means trying to figure out how to work together to meet our individual needs, how to work with each other rather than “for” or against each other. And when this is impossible, it means preferring strife to submission and domination.

—It means not valuing any system or ideology above the people it purports to serve, not valuing anything theoretical above the real things in this world. It means being faithful to real human beings (and animals, etc.), fighting for ourselves and for each other, not out of “responsibility,” not for “causes” or other intangible concepts.

—It means not forcing your desires into a hierarchical order, either, but accepting and embracing all of them, accepting yourself. It means not trying to force the self to abide by any external laws, not trying to restrict your emotions to the predictable or the practical, not pushing your instincts and desires into boxes: for there is no cage large enough to accommodate the human soul in all its flights, all its heights and depths.

—It means refusing to put the responsibility for your happiness in anyone else’s hands, whether that be parents, lovers, employers, or society itself. It means taking the pursuit of meaning and joy in your life upon your own shoulders.

For what else should we pursue, if not happiness? If something isn’t valuable because we find meaning and joy in it, then what could possibly make it important? How could abstractions like “responsibility,” “order,” or “propriety” possibly be more important than the real needs of the people who invented them? Should we serve employers, parents, the State, God, capitalism, moral law before ourselves? Who was it that taught you we should, anyway?

-Thank you Crimethink.

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